Reviews

Review of AFG Plains

 

http://olewnick.blogspot.com/2009/04/robbie-avenaimcor-fuhlerdale-gorfinkel.html

 

Saturday, April 25, 2009


Robbie Avenaim/Cor Fuhler/Dale Gorfinkel – Plains (Conundrom)

Fuhler’s releases on his own label continue to surprise and delight. This 2006 recording finds Cor on two pianos, his companions on vibraphones (Avenaim doubling percussion). The trio takes maximum advantage of this instrumentation, not just in the ringing tintinnabulations (Fuhler approaching the piano most often with e-bow, it seems), but with mechanical attacks of the vibes and a healthy dose of ratcheting crunchiness. Four tracks, each with its own virtues, each having something of a layered feel, proceeding in a steady stream of keens, hums and jangles. There are times (no doubt due to the instruments involved) where it subtly recalls the Bryars of “Hommages”, other times it drifts into steady-state AMM-ish territory. Excellent balance between serenity and hyperactivity. I’ve played it five or six times today, Saturday, and I’m hearing new stuff each run through, always a pleasure.

If they don’t have it already, erstdist should have it soon.

 

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INFINITE MUSIC MACHINE

Dale Gorfinkel, Rosalind Hall, and Peter Blamey’s Infinite Music Machine is a large installation of sonorous found objects. Ping pong balls, polystyrene cups, electric motors, string and many other materials are strewn across West Space. The intimate gallery, with rugs and pillows lying about, presented an engaging space for sonic exploration on Saturday. Performing two improvised sets, the artists made use of these various musical contraptions along with Gorfinkel’s modified trumpet and Hall’s saxophone. The performance made a terrifically active use of the space, developing a music trajectory whilst maintaining a highly exploratory and playful nature. The true immersion of the audience within the artists’ sound sculpture created an intimate and enjoyable level of engagement.

Jared Davis

http://www.liquidarchitecture.org.au/festival-2009-blog/17-tour-blog/92-blog-13-melbourne-3

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Music is what?

Experimental music is alive and well in Australia, as the What Is Music? festival makes abundantly clear.

By Andrew P Street

…..While the notion of the modified guitar is hardly a new one, Dale Gorfinkel has spent the last seven years taking instrument modification to strange new places – specifically, the vibraphone. Among his innovations are the addition of motorised mechanisms to play the instrument, adding extra bars tuned to microtones (notes between the notes), unit amplication and more, which might give some insight into what he describes as his “vibraphone deconstructions”.

Not only does he coax impossible sounds out of his instrument – the modifications themselves transform the vibraphone into an artwork in its own right.

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Realtime oct-nov2008

http://www.realtimearts.net/article.php?id=9196

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Realtime Arts Dec-Jan 2009 – Vaucanson’s Duck

http://www.realtimearts.net/article.php?id=8809

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kind words from francis plagne about Vaucanson’s Duck

Robbie Avenaim, Dale Gorfinkel and Ernie Althoff set up homemade instruments and played twin prepared vibraphones and found instruments over the top, inviting a swag of experimental artists to improvise alongside them and Plagne was at three of the concerts.“They pretty much just made all these instruments that played themselves. And Dale and Robbie both had their vibraphones. Ernie just did really strange things. So they turned these instruments that played themselves on and off and then Robbie and Dale would just play live over the top and Ernie would play…like…jam jars.”

“I mean the stuff they were doing was really incredible. The way they were playing was like an ideal sort of form of improvising for me. It was spread out in the space, really layered, really non-linear and strange. I mean the show they did with [Anthony] Pateras was amazing.”


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sonic interiors

simon charles: liquid architecture 9, melbourne

Simon Charles is the RealTime-Aphids Writer-in-Residence

Dale Gorfinkel from Metalog, Liquid Architecture 9 Melbourne Dale Gorfinkel from Metalog, Liquid Architecture 9 Melbourne
photo Louise M Cooper

BRINGING TOGETHER A GROUP OF PRACTITIONERS USUALLY ON THE PERIPHERY OF MUSICAL CULTURE, LIQUID ARCHITECTURE PROVIDES AN IMPORTANT FORUM, RAISING THE PROFILE OF SOUND ART AND BRINGING IT TO A LARGER AUDIENCE. IN DOING SO IT HAS ADAPTED SOUND ART MODES OF PRESENTATION RATHER THAN THE TRADITIONAL INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT MODEL. IN NORTH MELBOURNE TOWN HALL SIX CHANNELS OF SOUND SURROUND THE AUDIENCE, SEATED IN A CIRCLE, CREATING AN IMMERSIVE LISTENING ENVIRONMENT. LISTENING BECOMES A MUCH MORE INWARD EXPERIENCE. THE AUDIENCE ENTERS A MEDITATIVE SPACE, DRAWN TO SUBTLETIES IN THE SOUND AND THE KINAESTHETIC SENSATIONS THEY EVOKE.

Making effective use of the multi-speaker setup, Jacques Soddell presented a work that sent field recordings, samples and white noise sliding around the space. Not afraid to use single sound sources with gaps and silence, this work slowly developed out of simplicity, often returning to samples almost as a kind of recurring theme. Rod Price presented a work similar in its use of field recordings and synthesised sound, although combined in a way to create a darker and heavier atmosphere. Sound masses would often build, colliding with other loud gestures, creating a sense of immediate impact and whiplash.

Canadian artist Robert Normandeau, a highlight of this year’s program, presented a three movement work with a subtle control of dynamic, dispersing sound around the space to dizzying affect. These works, characterised by voices murmuring and chattering, stood out in the way they used sound to create a feeling of movement, shifting energy and momentum skilfully between medium, fast and extremely fast. French artist Cedric Peyronnet’s was also a standout performance, masterfully combining field recordings from the French countryside to create surreal atmospheres, building to levels of high intensity and energy. Taking a different tack, Lawrence English’s work began exploring the lower end of the volume spectrum. Distorted shards of low pitched timbres were gradually layered to build a slow moving and ambient texture. Particularly interesting in this work was the beating of sound waves, caused by slight discrepancies in pitch.

German artist Andrew Peckler opted for a lighter and more playful approach, presenting a work largely built upon harpsichord and celeste samples. These semi-melodic fragments, combined with oscillators, ring modulators and a modular synthesiser, gradually evolved into a predominately rhythmic piece. Breaking from the mould, Peckler’s work might just as easily be heard in a club—a real break with the austerity and seriousness usually felt at these town hall performances. To Peckler’s credit, this piece had buoyancy and colour created through pitch organisation and contrasting rhythms, even if at times the drum ‘n’ bass-ish sections did feel a little out of place.

The collaborative ensemble Metalog comprises Jim Denley (alto saxophone), Amanda Stewart (voice, text), Natasha Anderson (contrabass recorder), Dale Gorfinkel (vibraphone, trumpet), Robbie Avenaim (percussion) and Ben Byrne (tape and electronics). Focussed on bridging the gap between laptop and instrumental performance, Metalog presented a work with a diverse sonic spectrum, yet with a feeling of ensemble interaction and collaborative composition.

Denley’s gurgling water through his saxophone, Stewart’s lip chattering and the motor on Gorfinkel’s vibes repeatedly striking various objects provided a charactersitic Metalog layering of sonic planes of various timbral densities. These larger gestures were punctuated throughout by shorter rhythmic shapes, mainly articulated by Denley and Anderson. The success of this work came from the bringing together of six very compatible artists, always listening closely, never cluttered, and maintaining their distinctive voices while sustaining a strong aesthetic direction throughout. As in much of Liquid Architecture 9, the sounds generated by the works fell outside traditional musical syntax, encouraging the listener to become absorbed in the very sound itself.
Liquid Architecture 9, North Melbourne Town Hall, July 18-19

Simon Charles is the RealTime-Aphids Writer-in-Residence

RealTime issue #87 Oct-Nov 2008 pg. 47

© Simon Charles; for permission to link or reproduce apply to realtime@realtimearts.net

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Realtime NOW now Article

http://www.realtimearts.net/article.php?id=8966

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